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How To Teach Your Puppy His Name

There is a good chance you have already named your puppy. If not, now is a great time because your puppy’s
name is very important in many ways. Your puppy’s name could even save his life one day. In this article i will
give you some tips to getting your puppy to learn his name.

What if your dog was chasing a ball out into the street? What if a car was coming towards him? Calling his name and him responding even in the middle of playing will keep him safe from any harm. It will be easier if you use it’s name every time you talk to him and with ever command (except NO and STAY). Don’t ever associate the dog’s name with something negative or they wont want to come again. Changing the puppy’s name could be bad. Even giving it a nickname could confuse him and that’s the last thing you want.

A couple tricks i used were pretty easy like always calling them nicely (even if I didn’t want to).I only scolded them when I caught them in the act. Its hard to get used to, but in the end it will pay off.

A great game you can play with your dog to teach his name is The Name Game. It is fun, easy, and great for kids to play with the puppy to. It is pretty basic with easy commands and is fun for the puppy. The rules are

· Take your dog to the park or anywhere convenient for you maybe your back yard and keep him on leash (it works a lot better if you have a longer leash maybe about 10 feet).
· Give him 4 to 7 feet to wonder away.
· When he’s not looking call his name with an excited voice and make sure he comes to you (if he doesn’t come pull him in with his leash).
· When he gets to you give him tons of love and affection
· Repeat this over and over again until your puppy is consistently coming to you when you call his name.

***Whenever you’re trying to get your puppy’s attention you have to be the most exciting thing in the world…more exciting then the birds, smells, other dogs, joggers…you get the picture…

I hope you enjoyed these great tips on how to teach your puppy his name. The little one should be coming to your side in no time.

Train Your Pup To Behave When Left Home Alone:

Coaching a puppy that spends a lot of time home alone could prove to be quite the challenge, but it’s not impossible. The best thing to do is to start training your pup right away. Serious habits and issues in growing dogs usually begin to develop around six months of age or older.

As the care giver of your new pup, it’s crucial for you to offer a place of comfort, safety and belonging. Puppies that are well nurtured will generally transform into a more mentally stable adult. Puppies that are denied the safety of affection and positive reinforcement will grow up fearful and filled with anxiety.

The very first point you need to establish in your new puppy, is that his new home is a place where he is accepted. As soon as your puppy feels he is secure and cherished, he’s ready to begin obedience training.

This form of training should execute as a matter of routine. Training sessions must be performed in a peaceful method, which should always end on a positive note. Your pet will look forward to each session especially if you reward his efforts with a treat. Be careful not to show any frustration and anger as this could reverse any previous training success.

There is a fine distinction between a dog requiring a firm hand because he behaves headstrong and willfully refuses to obey, and a canine requiring endurance because he lacks confidence or doesn’t quite understand. The fact of the matter is very simple. Generally, all dogs want to please their owner and be your best friend.

Training sessions should ultimately last no longer than 15 minutes. A puppy’s attention span is very similar like that of a small child’s. Curiosity will undoubtedly take over. Forcing a younger puppy to endure sessions longer than 15 minutes can be frustrating for the both of you. It may also be non-productive, and sabotage all training efforts.

A puppy that is left home alone for more than 4 hours a day requires proper coaching to be taught during that time without excessive barking or other destructive unruly behavior. Your puppy’s first learning experience begins the second that he enters your home. A useful tip is to have a TV or radio on low just before you leave the house as this may provide a setting where he does not feel completely alone.

Puppy Training Tips for the First Week:

Every interaction with your puppy is a training opportunity. Training a puppy when you first bring them home is critical. It is obvious that you need certain items such as a dog bed, crate, food and water bowls, puppy chow, collar, leash, toys, etc. Equally as important, all family members must decide on routine, responsibility and rules.

Your new puppy has just been taken away from his mother and littermates. You may want to spread paper on the floor and put her food and water bowls in one corner. Scatter some toys around everywhere.

Prior to introducing a new puppy to your home, make sure to puppy proof it. Take an in-depth look at your home from the puppy’s viewpoint. As you move things out of reach, remember it is only for a short period of time. By removing these objects of curiosity from the start, it will allow you to work with your puppy on the basic training he will need to learn. Once your new puppy has learned his place, you can put your things back in their original spots.

As much as you want your new puppy to be a functioning asset in the house hold, remember that your puppy is still an animal. Puppies are product to their environment. The main instinct of dogs is to live in a pack. Your puppy will assume his new family is his pack. If your pup gets the sense that he is his own boss and can do whatever he wants, he is being taught he is the leader of the pack.

When first introduced your puppy to a crate, don’t just put him inside and lock the door. Try placing the crate in a room where the family commonly gathers. With close proximity of the crate with family, the puppy will feel he is still with the pack. Keep the crate in a place where it will stay, and simply keep the door open during the day. Most puppies are very curious, so generally they will walk inside. Others may be a little more shy with the crate, so give your pup some time to warm up to his crate. When he does begin to enter the crate, make sure to praise him. Try giving the crate a name. Repeat the crates name whenever your pup goes inside, and then give him a tasty treat.

How to Teach Your Puppy His Name:

Once you have chosen a name for your puppy, you need to teach him what it is. Your objective is to teach him that when his name is called, you are requesting his full attention and to look directly at you.

As you go on to teach your puppy commands, such as come, sit and stay, you’ll do this successfully if your puppy is focused on you whilst you are teaching him these commands – this is why it’s so important he knows his name and responds to it.

Your puppy will start to learn that the sound of his name will be followed by a command, so to him, his name means that something is being specifically asked of him. When you use your puppy’s name, you must keep it associated with good things. Don’t call his name and then proceed to yell at him because he’s chewed something of yours. If you do this too often he’ll start to associate his name with being screamed at and won’t respond when you call. Realistically, his is easier said than done, but it will be worth all your hard efforts in the end.

So arm yourself with some tasty treats and put a leash on your puppy. That way you have complete control if he gets distracted by something or tries to wander off. Call his name in a positive and voice. Puppy’s love to hear your voice and will naturally look towards you when they hear you speak. As he looks in your direction, give him a treat and praise him verbally with “good boy”. Repeat this several times each day until he consistently looks towards you every time his name is called.

The next progression is to introduce a distraction. Try this with other people in the room, out in the yard, in the driveway, when or anywhere else you can think of. Don’t rush this step and always make it easy for your puppy to succeed, he wants to please you, so do your best to make it easy for him.

You need to teach your puppy that wherever you are, no matter the distraction, if he hears his name he needs to look at you and wait for further instruction. So, take small steps that can easily be achieved, then you will both look forward to every training session.

Common Mistakes When Training Your New Pup

Puppies are capable of learning simple commands from a very young age. Don’t try to give your puppy a meaningful training session if he is highly excited, occupied with exploring, or tired. You need his complete attention. Otherwise you’re wasting both your time and his. You can build up to training sessions in more distracting environments once your puppy is reliably responding to your commands when at home.

When it comes to home training, you don’t need to be a rocket scientist to understand the concept, what goes in must come out. If you feed your puppy a quality, nutritious and balanced dog food and stick to regular meal times (3 times a day for young puppies, dropping down to twice a day for older dogs), then your puppy is more likely to have regular potty habits which means you’ll have a much better idea of what time to take him out. If, on the other hand, your constantly offering your puppy with treats and tidbits and feed him at random times of the day, you can expect your puppy to need to potty at any time of day too.

If you’re expectations are too high of your puppy to master all of your commands in the first couple of weeks, you are sadly mistaken and will be disappointed. Young puppies, in particular, have a lot of information to take in the first few weeks as they get settled into their new home away from their mom and siblings. Try to start off with two or three commands at the most sit. “Come” and “down” should be of top priority. Don’t move on to new commands until you are confident enough that your pup has mastered the basics.

Like an adolescent child, puppies have short attention spans and get tired very quickly. Remember, when training your puppy, keep sessions short. 5 to 10 minutes should be sufficient enough time. Two or three short training sessions every day is ideal. You can build in the command “come” throughout the day such as when you want to feed your puppy or take him outside.

A pup will learn much faster and affectively through the association of an action with a positive reward. However, our attention can also be very rewarding to a puppy. This can also include negative attention such as yelling, scolding, or punishment.

Basic Things all Puppies Should Learn

Dog training is a necessity, and it especially helps if you do it when they are young.  it is very important to teach puppy commands in their first year; it will form good habits that will come in handy with basic dog care, and keep the both of you out of trouble!  Here are a few basic things every puppy should learn.

Potty Training

It seems that all people should know to teach their dogs to go to the bathroom outside, but it is equally important for you to teach them to alert you when they have to go.  Unless you have a doggy door, you need to know when they have to go or you’ll end up with a soggy carpet, and that doesn’t smell so good.

Stop and Stay

Training your dog to stop and stay is very important when considering dangerous situations and manners around others.  If your dog runs off when you open the door or if they get off their leash, you need to have the control of making them stop and stay.  This also comes in handy when you have guests over and your puppy is pestering them.

NO jumping

Jumping may be adorable when they are puppies, but you don’t want your full grown dog jumping on children or elderly friends, so break the habit!

Puppy Socialization

Let your puppy be friendly and be around other animals, but know when to limit them.  It is fine to let your dog play with other kitties or dogs, but don’t let them start chasing, biting, or harassing the other animal. Don’t eliminate dog play, just watch over how your puppy acts around other dogs.  Basically, teach them their limits of puppy socialization in order to be polite around others.

Dominance

Many dogs mistakenly believe they are the alpha of the house and take over the space as their territory.  This is a horrible thing to let your dogs do.  Letting them think that they are in charge will make them lash out and become violent in situations that are not appropriate.  If your dog starts growling at you as a puppy, it is a good idea to take them to a dog obedience class.  One of my puppies used to growl, and a good way to show them that you are in charge is to simply flip them onto their back.  We repeatedly flipped him on his back whenever he acted out, and now he is now the nicest family dog you could ask for!  Doing this a few times will send the message that you’re the boss.

If you have any questions about puppy training, ask, message, or call our Florida dog training center.

How to Teach a Puppy Not to Jump

Puppies are a ball full of energy jumping on furniture and people everywhere they go.  Unfortunately, this causes a nuisance to visitors and destroys furniture.  Here are some tips to teach your puppy how not to jump on furniture…or people.

What to Do When Someone Enters

Does your puppy jump on visitors upon arrival?  It is a common trait amongst puppies, but this habit can be changed.

First, keep treats by the door.  Put these somewhere out of your puppy’s reach.  Then, whenever the doorbell rings or someone knocks implement the “sit” and “stay” commands.  Use the treats to reward your pup for sitting still and listening.  If your pup starts to stir, just give your pup a look.  Your dog will understand what it means.  Remember to never yell at your puppy.   Yelling doesn’t work on dogs.  It just confuses your pet.

What to Do When YOU Enter

How do you enter the house after a long day at work?  Do you call for your puppy in an excited voice?  Your actions have a direct impact on your puppy’s behavior.

For instance, if your pup is jumping when you open the door, and you are petting your pup at the same time, then this translates to your pet that the jumping action is rewarded.  The pup jumps, your puppy gets attention.  Instead, teach your puppy to be calm when you come home.  This will stop the jumping habit from escalating out of control.

For more advice about how to use positive reinforcement methods with puppies, talk to a puppy kindergarten instructor or enroll in puppy preschool today.

Teach Command: “In” and “Out” of the Tub

Teach Your Dog the Commands “In” and “Out”

When it is time to bathe your dog, whether it is with a groomer or yourself, it helps to teach your pup how to get in and out of the tub.  It will save you time and energy in the end.  This is an outline of an effective, positive reinforcement method.

Use Treats and a Plain Box

First, prepare dog treats ahead of time.  Cut tiny pieces of chicken, cheese or a hot dog to use as incentive. Then find an empty cardboard box. The size should be big enough so a dog may be able to get inside and out comfortably.  Next, show your dog the treat.  Say, “Get in,” and toss the treat into the box.  Wait until your dog follows the treat.  Once your pup does, show adoration and say, “good.”  This allows the dog to associate these words with the physical actions.  It makes the idea of getting into the box as something delightful.  Later these same emotions will transfer to getting into a tub eliminating any fear.

Provide Positive Encouragement

The next part is teaching your dog to get out of the box.  This sometimes takes longer for the pup to comprehend.  But do not fret.

The way to start is by clapping your hands, stepping away from the box, and saying the command, “Get out.”  Do not be aggressive in your tone.  Still keep the mood light.  Your dog should follow.  Once your dog gets out do not offer treat.  Instead, show plenty of praise.  The reason being it emphasizes the fact that getting into the tub is the fun part.

For more information on how to teach your pup these commands consult with a Florida dog training professional or enroll in puppy kindergarten today!

Why Puppy Preschool?

Bringing Home Your New Puppy

Bringing home a puppy is an exciting time in one’s life.  The puppy is full of energy, running around, and adorable.  It is impossible not to love those first moments.  But as soon as the puppy starts chewing up the shoes, furniture, and household items, then it is difficult to maintain a joyful demeanor.  A person may easily direct tension and stress at the puppy for not listening.  This does not help you or the puppy to be in such a negative state of mind.  For the beginning should center on bonding, not scolding your puppy.  Thus, why not attend a puppy preschool class and allow an experienced professional teach you the basic skills to create a fun, loving, healthy home.

Learning the Basics

When you first bring home a puppy, have you noticed how difficult it is to get the puppy to come when called?  Puppy preschool will teach you how to call for your puppy properly.  It will engage the puppy in coming when being called ensuring the puppy associates the two and delivers successfully.  It makes the experience of owning a puppy fun for both the owner and the pup.

In addition, puppy preschool will address how to handle the biting and mouthing.  It will teach the commands sit, drop, stay and let’s go.  Florida puppy training instructs on toilet training, mat training, and calming behavior.  The class should cover nutrition, health, vaccinations, and flea treatments.

Bonding with Your Pup

It is essential to attend a puppy-training course.  It helps ease your puppy’s transition into its new home and gives an opportunity to build a relationship between you and your puppy.