Tag-Archive for » puppy tips «

Submissive Urination in a Puppy

Submissive wetting or urination is unfortunately a normal way for pups to demonstrate submissive behavior. Even a puppy that is for the most part housetrained may leave dribbles and puddles of urine on the floor by your feet when they greet you.

When it comes to puppies, submissive urination is the ultimate way of showing their respect for you and the desire for a higher rank in the pack. It occurs frequently with young pups that have not yet learned and perfected very important social skills. Submissive urination in adult puppies is more than likely a sign of insecurity. Often pups that are not socialized or unfortunately in some cases abused pups will submissively urinate. Other puppies that engage in submissive urination may simply have not been shown or demonstrated that there are more acceptable ways to show respect. Such as raising a paw for a hand shake or giving a kiss with a simple lick.

Submissive urination may be present in overly sensitive or mistreated puppies because they feel the need to constantly apologize. The root cause of this state of mind is often caused by excessive or delayed punishment. This of course will frighten and confuse the puppy without having taught him how to make amends in a proper manner. The puppy resorts to the only way he knows how to show respect and fear, by submissive urination. When your puppy submissively urinates, it is best to just ignore him. If you try to reassure him, he will think you are praising him for urinating and will in turn urinate more frequently. If you raise your voice and yell at him, he will feel an even greater need to apologize by urinating. Both reassurance and scolding will only make submissive urination a much bigger issue.

Treatment of submissive urination must be directed towards building your puppy’s confidence and showing him better ways of demonstrating and showing respect. The quickest way to accomplish this is by teaching your puppy a few basic obedience exercises. A puppy that can earn praise by obeying a simple routine of “Come here, sit, shake hands,” will soon develop a crucial level of self esteem and confidence. Therefore a more confident puppy with high self esteem who can say, “Hello” by simply sitting and shaking hands does not feel the need or urge to urinate at his owner’s feet.

Train Your Pup To Behave When Left Home Alone:

Coaching a puppy that spends a lot of time home alone could prove to be quite the challenge, but it’s not impossible. The best thing to do is to start training your pup right away. Serious habits and issues in growing dogs usually begin to develop around six months of age or older.

As the care giver of your new pup, it’s crucial for you to offer a place of comfort, safety and belonging. Puppies that are well nurtured will generally transform into a more mentally stable adult. Puppies that are denied the safety of affection and positive reinforcement will grow up fearful and filled with anxiety.

The very first point you need to establish in your new puppy, is that his new home is a place where he is accepted. As soon as your puppy feels he is secure and cherished, he’s ready to begin obedience training.

This form of training should execute as a matter of routine. Training sessions must be performed in a peaceful method, which should always end on a positive note. Your pet will look forward to each session especially if you reward his efforts with a treat. Be careful not to show any frustration and anger as this could reverse any previous training success.

There is a fine distinction between a dog requiring a firm hand because he behaves headstrong and willfully refuses to obey, and a canine requiring endurance because he lacks confidence or doesn’t quite understand. The fact of the matter is very simple. Generally, all dogs want to please their owner and be your best friend.

Training sessions should ultimately last no longer than 15 minutes. A puppy’s attention span is very similar like that of a small child’s. Curiosity will undoubtedly take over. Forcing a younger puppy to endure sessions longer than 15 minutes can be frustrating for the both of you. It may also be non-productive, and sabotage all training efforts.

A puppy that is left home alone for more than 4 hours a day requires proper coaching to be taught during that time without excessive barking or other destructive unruly behavior. Your puppy’s first learning experience begins the second that he enters your home. A useful tip is to have a TV or radio on low just before you leave the house as this may provide a setting where he does not feel completely alone.

Puppy Training Tips for the First Week:

Every interaction with your puppy is a training opportunity. Training a puppy when you first bring them home is critical. It is obvious that you need certain items such as a dog bed, crate, food and water bowls, puppy chow, collar, leash, toys, etc. Equally as important, all family members must decide on routine, responsibility and rules.

Your new puppy has just been taken away from his mother and littermates. You may want to spread paper on the floor and put her food and water bowls in one corner. Scatter some toys around everywhere.

Prior to introducing a new puppy to your home, make sure to puppy proof it. Take an in-depth look at your home from the puppy’s viewpoint. As you move things out of reach, remember it is only for a short period of time. By removing these objects of curiosity from the start, it will allow you to work with your puppy on the basic training he will need to learn. Once your new puppy has learned his place, you can put your things back in their original spots.

As much as you want your new puppy to be a functioning asset in the house hold, remember that your puppy is still an animal. Puppies are product to their environment. The main instinct of dogs is to live in a pack. Your puppy will assume his new family is his pack. If your pup gets the sense that he is his own boss and can do whatever he wants, he is being taught he is the leader of the pack.

When first introduced your puppy to a crate, don’t just put him inside and lock the door. Try placing the crate in a room where the family commonly gathers. With close proximity of the crate with family, the puppy will feel he is still with the pack. Keep the crate in a place where it will stay, and simply keep the door open during the day. Most puppies are very curious, so generally they will walk inside. Others may be a little more shy with the crate, so give your pup some time to warm up to his crate. When he does begin to enter the crate, make sure to praise him. Try giving the crate a name. Repeat the crates name whenever your pup goes inside, and then give him a tasty treat.

Why Does My Puppy Bite and How Do I Take Control?

Your puppies need for biting is a perfectly natural and essential phase to go through, especially when they are teething. With this being said, however, it is not acceptable to have your pup chewing on you, or anyone for that matter.

Puppy biting or nipping starts out as a bit of fun, but needs to be controlled quickly to avoid ongoing problems. Most puppies can be trained to regulate and minimize the biting fairly easily. The sooner you get started educating your puppy not to bite, the easier it will be. Remember, the younger the pup, the “softer” the bite.

Proven Techniques:

If you catch the biting, just try to redirect the biting from your flesh to a toy or chew bone. For very young puppies this method is often all you need do. As soon as your pup starts to bite your hands just let out a firm ”No!” and replace your fingers with a chew toy.

Make your puppy think he is hurting you each time he has a nip at you. This method replicates the way dogs sort out this biting amongst themselves. When puppies are biting and nipping each other it only stops when one puppy lets out a yelp. We can use this natural way dogs learn by letting out an “Ouch!”  every time your puppy bites. The trick is to startle your dog using your voice, and then pull away and stop playing with your puppy for a while. Your pup will soon learn that when he begins to bite, his friend goes away.

In bad biting cases, as soon as your puppy latches onto your hand say “No!” and quickly put your thumb inside his mouth under his tongue. Your other finger will be under his chin and pinch down, but not to tightly. This will feel uncomfortable to your puppy and he won’t be able to bite you.

If your puppy has an even more severe biting problem, try putting on a pair of gloves and apply a foul tasting substance to them. Your dog will soon understand that if he bites you, it won’t be very pleasant! This method produces a strong negative association to your dog every time he decides to bite you. Some dogs are smart enough to realize that when you take your foul tasting gloves off, it is fine to bite you again.

Thinking About Getting a New Dog?

When you are thinking of getting a new dog, there are many things to take into consideration.  Becoming a dog owner is a big decision, so before you get one, there are a few things you want to be sure of.  Firstly, make sure you have room for a new pet in your life.  A dog is a big responsibility, and you should be committed to if you are going to get one.  Also think of the cost of owning a dog. If getting a dog suits your life style, congratulations! Here are a few dog adoption tips.

Size

When most people consider getting a new dog, they have a size in mind.  Dog sizes span from those adorable little lap dogs to the goofy big dogs, so make sure you have a type in mind.  Different dogs can live comfortably in different living situations.  If you live in a small house or apartment, it is probably best to get a medium, or smaller sized dog for the animal’s comfort.  No matter how much you may like big dogs, they can wreak havoc in smaller houses.  Also consider that small dogs are very fragile, and often are seriously injured by clumsiness. Additionally, Cool climates are more ideal for larger dogs, while small dogs tend to live better in warmer places.

Age

Age is a big deal when trying to choose a dog.  Puppies can be really cute, but if you don’t want to put in all the extra time and effort into training one, you may want to consider getting an older dog. Just in case you do want to adopt a puppy, here are a few puppy tips The first six months of having a puppy will most likely be the hardest.  The first few months involve potty training, teaching them not to chew furniture and clothes, coping with other house animals, and many other things.  Also keep in mind that puppies may seem calm when you first see them, but with a puppy you want to see it a few times before deciding, seeing as they can be unbelievably tired and then eccentrically energetic.  Adopting an adult dog can be an excellent choice if you want to know the dog’s regular energy level, and temperament.

Type

Lastly, you want to look at the type of dog you want.  There is a surplus of dogs to choose from, so do your research! From Rhodesian ridge backs to French bulldogs, there is a big difference in every type of dog.

How to Feed Your Puppy

Puppies born into a new home is an exciting time for everyone involved.  The entire household gets to watch the puppies develop and grow.  But to make sure you start your puppy off on the right paw, there are a few rules experts agree upon across the board in regards to feeding your new puppy.  Here is a basic outline providing you with a guideline on puppy feeding rules.

When puppy newborns arrive, it is important to keep the puppy with the mom.  The puppy, for the first four weeks, receives complete nutrition from a mother’s milk.  Thus, you want to keep the two together until the puppy has passed this stage.  And do not make any food substitutions for the mother’s milk.  It is a necessity for the puppy to grow up strong and healthy.  It is the foundation of the puppy’s entire life.

Next thing to pay attention to is that puppies expand much energy.  It takes a lot for the little one to move around.  So you need to feed your puppy lots of protein for this is what allows your puppy to have the energy to move about in a fit manner.  You need to check with a Florida dog obedience professional regarding the requirement for specific breeds, but for the most part, you need to feed your puppy food that contains twenty-five to thirty percent protein.

These are basic feeding tips for your puppy.  To find out more enroll in a puppy preschool or puppy kindergarten class today.

How to Housetrain Your Puppy

House training a puppy is not as difficult as people first believe.  You solely need to be dedicated to helping your puppy learn this transition in a positive manner.  You need to remain calm and see your puppy through the process with lots of praise and positive reinforcement.  Here are a few tricks on how to successfully housetrain your puppy.

Keep a Feeding Schedule

When house training your puppy, keep track of the feeding schedule.  A puppy needs to use the restroom frequently and can’t hold it for long.  Thus, every time after you feed and water your pup, take your pup outside.  It will keep your puppy on track regarding when to go and where.  Your puppy will become accustomed to the location and understand that this is where the pup is expected to release waste.

Choose a Command

Your puppy will be at the stage where a command needs to be linked to the act of going to the bathroom.  This way when your puppy grows up, your canine will remember the command you choose means to go to the bathroom.  Please note, there is no specific command used for this act either.  Just select something and stay consistent with it.  You need your pup to recognize the command and utilize it accordingly.

If you need more tips on how to housetrain your puppy, talk to a Florida dog obedience training professional today.  He/she will be able to help guide you through the proper ways to housetrain your puppy.  You might also want to enroll in puppy preschool classes ensuring you receive the basics before moving on with your puppy.