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How To Teach Your Puppy His Name

There is a good chance you have already named your puppy. If not, now is a great time because your puppy’s
name is very important in many ways. Your puppy’s name could even save his life one day. In this article i will
give you some tips to getting your puppy to learn his name.

What if your dog was chasing a ball out into the street? What if a car was coming towards him? Calling his name and him responding even in the middle of playing will keep him safe from any harm. It will be easier if you use it’s name every time you talk to him and with ever command (except NO and STAY). Don’t ever associate the dog’s name with something negative or they wont want to come again. Changing the puppy’s name could be bad. Even giving it a nickname could confuse him and that’s the last thing you want.

A couple tricks i used were pretty easy like always calling them nicely (even if I didn’t want to).I only scolded them when I caught them in the act. Its hard to get used to, but in the end it will pay off.

A great game you can play with your dog to teach his name is The Name Game. It is fun, easy, and great for kids to play with the puppy to. It is pretty basic with easy commands and is fun for the puppy. The rules are

· Take your dog to the park or anywhere convenient for you maybe your back yard and keep him on leash (it works a lot better if you have a longer leash maybe about 10 feet).
· Give him 4 to 7 feet to wonder away.
· When he’s not looking call his name with an excited voice and make sure he comes to you (if he doesn’t come pull him in with his leash).
· When he gets to you give him tons of love and affection
· Repeat this over and over again until your puppy is consistently coming to you when you call his name.

***Whenever you’re trying to get your puppy’s attention you have to be the most exciting thing in the world…more exciting then the birds, smells, other dogs, joggers…you get the picture…

I hope you enjoyed these great tips on how to teach your puppy his name. The little one should be coming to your side in no time.

Teaching Your New Puppy Good Sleeping Habits

Bringing your little puppy home for the very first time is a special day. It might be really exciting for you, but the weeks to follow could be challenging. They might be cute and cuddly but the late night potty trips or play time might give you some trouble. I will give you a couple tips on making those midnight trips a little less stressful.

When training a puppy to have a steady sleeping pattern there’s a couple ways you can do it. The best way is to have the puppy sleep in your room, so you can keep an eye on him. Another option is to have your own dedicated area for him. If you choose to leave Fido in another room leaving a fan, music, or even a white noise machine on will soothe him to sleep. You will start to see results in a short period of time.

Some of the preparations are before you put Fido to sleep. Puppy’s tend to sleep a lot and they don’t seem to care when it is. For the pup to sleep during the evening will make him want to get up and play in the middle of the night when he is rejuvenated. Try to avoid the evening sleep. Another thing is try to stay away from food or water before bed. Giving the pup any food or water before bedtime is a guaranteed rough night for you when there belly or bladder is full. Roughly 3 hours before bed is best.

Now comes that dreadful moment, the late night potty trip. This is where the puppy usually finds out he can wake you up by whining or making noises. When this time comes to let your little pup out to go potty remember its strictly business time. Avoid talking or playing. If you tend to play around and talking to the dog at night he will think he can get more attention by making noise at night. Just keep it to a “good boy” and back to bed. Be sure to not let him sit there and bark when the pup needs to go, take him out.

If you stick to these tips and keep the puppy on schedule you will see an improvement in no time. Your pup will be sleeping through the night in no time.

Dog Agility Training & Competition

Getting Ready for Training:

If you have been seriously considering signing your dog up for agility training, then you should take the proper steps to prepare your k9 companion for what lies in store for them. Now what is dog agility you might ask? It’s a great sport that involves you and your dog, using teamwork towards a common goal. Not only is it quite entertaining to watch, it can be very addictive for the owner and dog alike, once both of you get the hang of it.

Now lets go through how it all works. The Handler directs their dog through an obstacle course of a-frames, weave poles, dog walks, tunnels, jumps, teeter totters, and chutes, in a race for accuracy and over all time.

You can’t however touch your dog or any of the obstacles that’s against the rules. There is also no use of a leash. You can only use visual and audible cues to direct your dog through the course.

Next you should factor in some tips about how to prepare your dog. This will be physical, Show your dog what it will be engaging in throughout any of the serious training. Also, what it will experience later on if you wanted to go into competitions. Ultimately if your paying for training, your instructor will always know when your dog is ready for competition. So, don’t rush towards that too quickly. Ensure your dog is fully trained and is in peak condition.

Getting Ready for Competition:

Obviously your dog needs to be fit, considerably attentive and don’t forget excited to give this their all. It’s also important that they’re jumping confidently to there full height. Unless of course you aren’t aiming for a specific size class for your dog to eventually compete in. Which means over sized obstacles, so the dogs can fit through and between them without knocking them down. Unless you are sure the competitions won’t included weaves. Then just be sure the dog is focused on your commands and excited to be there.

Your dog will also be required to complete full sequences of obstacles pretty fluently. So, remember to be fair to your dog these competitions are a measure of there competence in the sport. Don’t force them to compete prematurely, make sure they’re well prepared for what’s expected of them.

In Closing, it’s important to remember to have fun while doing this. If your not having fun, your dog will sense your tension. This can cause your dog to start acting up, and not following your directions correctly. Always remain calm, content, and over all remember to have fun.

Diagnosis for Separation Anxiety in Dogs:

First, understand that your dog is not trying to get even with you for leaving him home alone. The destructive behaviors, going potty on the floor and neurotic behavior that accompany dog separation anxiety are linked to a panic response. Luckily, for you the owner, the panic response is a behavior that is successfully modified with corrective, positive reinforcement to help calm nerves and promote your dog’s confidence and wellbeing.

No one fully understands why there’s some dog that suffer anxieties more than others when some dogs don’t at all. However, it is known that dog separation anxiety sometimes occurs when a significant change in routine, structure or surroundings such as the absence of an important companion. This may also occur when moving into a new home, a new pet or person in the family, or perhaps a change in the normal feeding schedule.

Before we get into the process of what to do about dog separation anxiety, let’s spend a moment going over what NOT to do. First and foremost, don’t punish your dog. Punishment of any form is NOT an effective way to treat dog separation anxiety as well as any unwanted behaviors. A response such as this, on the part of the owner (you) only serves to reinforce the behavior you’re trying to do away with.

Providing another pet as a potential companion for your dog won’t exactly help either. Dog separation anxiety stems from your dog being separated from you and not so much from being alone. Being unable to play with another animal isn’t the same as just being plain old bored. There is a major difference between boredom and loneliness.

Incarcerating a dog with separation anxiety in a crate is also not the answer, nor a solution. A dog’s nature is to be free. A nervous dog locked in a crate is now left with a heightened panic response but now with a build up of paranoia and desperation on top of it. The added risk of your dog injuring himself in an attempt to escape from the crate is also heightened.

Obedience training alone will not address this psychological problem. Although, there is no question that obedience training is a satisfying and worthwhile experience for the both of you to enjoy. Dog separation anxiety is an uncorrected panic response and is unrelated to obedience as well as disobedience.

Dog Training with Positive Reinforcement:

Positive reinforcement dog training is a friendly method of teaching your dog to perform behaviors using dog food, treats and other positive actions in the form of a reward. Rewarding appropriate dog behavior makes that behavior more likely to become a future re-occurrence. This is one of the most powerful tools you can use to reshape or change your dog’s actions. Using positive reinforcement dog training teaches your dog what behaviors you do and don’t desire in a humane manner. This training method will also help to create healthier and much stronger bond between you and your dog.

Training based on physical punishment involves some level of discomfort or even pain and is most definitely not recommended. This also may cause your dog to bite in order to defend himself. Punishment may also be associated with other stimuli, including people, present at the time and occurrence of the punishment. For example, a dog that is punished for getting too close to a small child may become fearful or even defensive around that child.

When getting started, timing is key with positive reinforcement dog training. Your dog must be rewarded immediately for responding appropriately to your command. Every member of your family should use the same command system and of course, never reinforce the wrong behavior. For example, if you command your dog to sit, he should be given a treat the moment his bottom touches the floor. If you wait to long before giving him the treat after he stands up again, the moment will be lost. He will then think he is getting rewarded for standing, not sitting.

Most dogs will gladly work for positive rewards such as a tasty dog treat, play time and toys. We suggest that you choose a treat that is relatively small, soft, and easily broken apart. Treats should be highly valued by your dog as well as easy consumption. It is difficult to train a dog when he spends valuable time chewing and swallowing his reward. You want your dog to quickly eat the treat and look to you for more. Try to experiment with several different types of treats and find out which ones will work best. There are some dogs out there that are not motivated by food. If this is the case, try training using praise or build motivation through the company of other dogs.

Tips for Avoiding Common Dog Training Mistakes: (Part 1)

One of the easiest mistakes that can be made when training your dog is not paying attention. If your attention is elsewhere for even a short while, suddenly you may find that your puppy is off doing unspeakable things to you’re your furniture in the living room. You can not properly correct him unless you catch him red handed. All puppies have an incredibly short attention span. So, even just five minutes ago no longer exists. They will not make the mental connection when you are yelling about something they did minutes ago. When you can not pay attention to your puppy, he should then be in a safe place, like his crate, or perhaps by your side at all times.

Your dog will not know he has done something right when you fail to reward him for his good behavior. It is also crucial to communicate your praise to him in a language he can understand. The rewards do not necessarily always have to be something such as a treat. No matter what reward you may go with, your dog will need to connect the reward to his action in order for him to get the correct message. Instant praise is the best reward you could ever give. It’s instant gratification for your dog, and gives you a few seconds to provide the tasty treat reward if you have one. Those few seconds will fill in the gap between “Yay, I did things right!” and “Wow, what did I ever do to deserve an outcome like this?” This is extremely important during the earlier stages of the training process. This is especially true for when you are trying to get your dog to correlate his actions to your commands.

Another common mistake is to put things off for much too long. You may look at your little puppy, and think “it’s not absolutely necessary for him to need to learn anything just yet”. But what about walking on a leash, stay, coming when you call? This is especially true when a puppy’s natural instinct is to generally be by your side anyway, without incentive. But if you let things go for too long, your pup will not want to cooperate any longer. Training while your pup is still relatively young is the most solid way to get the basics into your dog’s head for good.

Teach your dog to Stand, Rollover, Crawl, Lay Down and Focus:

Teach your dog to Stand:
Starting from the sitting position, hold a treat right in front of the nose of your dog, then say stand. Then move the treat above him so that he will have to stand in order to reach it. As soon as he stands say good boy! Then wait for him to sit back down to give him the treat. While he is standing you can move just a few steps while holding the treat. Praise him a lot if he follows you.

Teach your dog to Rollover:
Starting from the laying position, say roll over and then proceed to roll your dog over gently. Do this by grabbing his legs and then pull him, or simply push him from one side so that he makes a complete roll. After he has completed the roll, make him sit, praise him and give him the treat.

Teach your dog to Crawl:
Starting from the laying position, say crawl while holding a treat in front of your dog’s nose and move it a few inches away from him. If he begins to stand up, just say no crawl, start from the beginning and have him lay back down again. Praise him a lot and give him the treat as soon as he crawls, even if it’s only a few inches.

Teach your dog to Lay Down:
There are various ways to do this. Begin with having your dog sit then say, lay. Then present the treat in front of his mouth, going all the way down to the ground with your hand. The dog will naturally follow your hand and will end up lying down. Give him the treat only when he stretches his forearms in front of him and then praise.

Teach your dog to Focus:
Begin by sitting or kneeling, in front of your dog. Hide your hands so he won’t be distracted looking at them and then say your dog’s name followed by saying focus. As soon as he looks at you in the eyes start praising him. Always keep eye contact and after a few seconds give him a treat. If he looks elsewhere, just call him again and begin to start over. Try to extend the time while he’s focused on you.

7 Reasons Dog Training Goes Wrong For Owners:

Allowing your dog to think it’s the leader of the pack. Your dog is an animal and a far different species to us humans. They do not share the same thought processes and the ability to rationalize like we do. Dogs live in packs with a clear hierarchy. There is an alpha or “pack leader” in every pack. You must make clear that you are in fact the alpha dog. You control every aspect of your dog’s life from exercise, feeding, and making all the decisions. Be the dominant leader, not your dog. if you allow your dog to take control he will develop behavioral problems. This will become an issue that is going to be much more difficult to solve as your dog gets older. Start out right from the beginning.

Try not to have training sessions last too long. Do not have high expectations of your dog to understand the training right away. Some dogs will learn and understand faster than others. Keep training sessions short as dogs generally have a much shorter attention span than we do. Teach your dog in a way that is fun, so both of you can enjoy.

Lack of exercise is often to blame. Exercise is very important to your dog, both physically and mentally. All dogs need their exercise. Different breeds have different requirements in duration and type of exercise. Taking a walk with your dog allows time for the two of you to bond and interact. He can meet other dogs and people. This will also allow him to take in all the different smells and sounds of the outdoors, which promotes healthy mental stimulation. Not give your dog daily exercise can lead to boredom and frustration which can lead to depression.

Don’t try to teach too much, too soon. When your dog begins to learn, he very quickly associates getting reward for following a command. This will help him to better understand the meaning of the command. However, even his favorite treat may not always get his attention. He could have been distracted by a strange noise or see something which caught his eye. Do not be too quick to give him a correction as this will only hinder any progression in the training. He is young and needs time to get used to what all the commands mean. Treat him as you would like to be treated, give clear commands, and always be kind but firm.

Tips to Introducing Your Dog to a New Dog:

Bringing home a new dog is always an exciting time for everyone. It’s like adding a new family member or guest to your household. There is a lot of information out there about bringing your first dog into the home. However, there is very little about bringing a new dog into the home of another dog. These simple tips should help you make some good decisions that will help ease the transition.

Unfortunately, many pet owners will underestimate the kinds of problems that can occur if mistakes are made. This can be a difficult if not dangerous situation if not handled correctly.

Many people think they can just bring a new dog home and let the dogs work things out amongst themselves. For the lucky ones this might work, but almost always people will find themselves in the middle of a dog fight wondering what went wrong.

The average dog owners do not have a clue about how strong the genetic pack instinct is that always lurks inside the mind of their lovable family pet. The addition of a second or third dog into the home often triggers a genetic pack drive or rank drive. Many people are shocked and confused when they see the level of aggression that their friendly family pet is plenty capable of.

Often, there is usually more than one thing going on that result in these problems. A house dog is often territorial of his home. There can be rank or dominance problems between the new and excising dog. There can also be an inter-male or female issue that will result in this aggression.

The most important part of this process is the purchase and use of dog crates. Try to have a dog crate for every dog in our house. Just because your current dogs don’t use crates is not a good enough reason to not use them in this process. First, put the new dog in a crate in your home where your current dog can freely go up and smell the newcomer. If your current house dog begins to growl at the new dog, immediately step right in, take control of the situation and give a strong correction.

Your job as the pack leader is to show your dog that is not expectable for aggression towards the newest pack member and will not be tolerated.

Training Tips for Successfully Walking Your Dog:

When walking your dog, does it ever seem like your getting pulled down the street or practically getting your arm ripped off when your dog sees another dog? This can make walking your dog seem like a chore, but with a little work and a lot of love, your beloved companion can be a joy to walk with regardless of where you go. Here are some helpful training tips to help you master the skill of walking your dog.

Always walking side by side with your dog is very important. Never allow him to lead the way, as this is a sign of dominance to the dog. The leader is always in charge. So as long as you continue to give in, your dog will remain in charge and pull you down the street to assert their authority. Keep a treat in hand to keep all the attention focused on you and where you want your dog to be during the walk.

Never lengthen or shorten the leash. The leash should remain the same length at all times. This will teach him that he is only allowed a certain distance from you. Until fully trained, retractable leashes should never be used during dog walks as they allow free range and authority over the walk. Plus, most large breed dogs can easily break retractable leashes.

Don’t give into pulling the leash for the entire walk. If your dog pulls you in a direction, give a snap back on the leash. Pay attention to the signs your dog is giving you and you will be able to predict any pulling. However, if your dog tries to take off, make sure to hold your ground. Plant your feet firmly on the ground, lean back and don’t move. Lowering your center of gravity will offset your dog and give him a good jolt.

Ignore other people and things that will interest your dog. If you give no attention to those things that may grab your dog’s attention, he will soon start to realize that it is not so important to be interested in it. If a dog is passing across the street, keep walking and ignore it. If he pulls towards that direction, keep walking straight and pull him along. After a while, he will see the other dog but it will no longer be of interest.