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How To Teach Your Puppy His Name

There is a good chance you have already named your puppy. If not, now is a great time because your puppy’s
name is very important in many ways. Your puppy’s name could even save his life one day. In this article i will
give you some tips to getting your puppy to learn his name.

What if your dog was chasing a ball out into the street? What if a car was coming towards him? Calling his name and him responding even in the middle of playing will keep him safe from any harm. It will be easier if you use it’s name every time you talk to him and with ever command (except NO and STAY). Don’t ever associate the dog’s name with something negative or they wont want to come again. Changing the puppy’s name could be bad. Even giving it a nickname could confuse him and that’s the last thing you want.

A couple tricks i used were pretty easy like always calling them nicely (even if I didn’t want to).I only scolded them when I caught them in the act. Its hard to get used to, but in the end it will pay off.

A great game you can play with your dog to teach his name is The Name Game. It is fun, easy, and great for kids to play with the puppy to. It is pretty basic with easy commands and is fun for the puppy. The rules are

· Take your dog to the park or anywhere convenient for you maybe your back yard and keep him on leash (it works a lot better if you have a longer leash maybe about 10 feet).
· Give him 4 to 7 feet to wonder away.
· When he’s not looking call his name with an excited voice and make sure he comes to you (if he doesn’t come pull him in with his leash).
· When he gets to you give him tons of love and affection
· Repeat this over and over again until your puppy is consistently coming to you when you call his name.

***Whenever you’re trying to get your puppy’s attention you have to be the most exciting thing in the world…more exciting then the birds, smells, other dogs, joggers…you get the picture…

I hope you enjoyed these great tips on how to teach your puppy his name. The little one should be coming to your side in no time.

Submissive Urination in a Puppy

Submissive wetting or urination is unfortunately a normal way for pups to demonstrate submissive behavior. Even a puppy that is for the most part housetrained may leave dribbles and puddles of urine on the floor by your feet when they greet you.

When it comes to puppies, submissive urination is the ultimate way of showing their respect for you and the desire for a higher rank in the pack. It occurs frequently with young pups that have not yet learned and perfected very important social skills. Submissive urination in adult puppies is more than likely a sign of insecurity. Often pups that are not socialized or unfortunately in some cases abused pups will submissively urinate. Other puppies that engage in submissive urination may simply have not been shown or demonstrated that there are more acceptable ways to show respect. Such as raising a paw for a hand shake or giving a kiss with a simple lick.

Submissive urination may be present in overly sensitive or mistreated puppies because they feel the need to constantly apologize. The root cause of this state of mind is often caused by excessive or delayed punishment. This of course will frighten and confuse the puppy without having taught him how to make amends in a proper manner. The puppy resorts to the only way he knows how to show respect and fear, by submissive urination. When your puppy submissively urinates, it is best to just ignore him. If you try to reassure him, he will think you are praising him for urinating and will in turn urinate more frequently. If you raise your voice and yell at him, he will feel an even greater need to apologize by urinating. Both reassurance and scolding will only make submissive urination a much bigger issue.

Treatment of submissive urination must be directed towards building your puppy’s confidence and showing him better ways of demonstrating and showing respect. The quickest way to accomplish this is by teaching your puppy a few basic obedience exercises. A puppy that can earn praise by obeying a simple routine of “Come here, sit, shake hands,” will soon develop a crucial level of self esteem and confidence. Therefore a more confident puppy with high self esteem who can say, “Hello” by simply sitting and shaking hands does not feel the need or urge to urinate at his owner’s feet.

Teach your dog to Stand, Rollover, Crawl, Lay Down and Focus:

Teach your dog to Stand:
Starting from the sitting position, hold a treat right in front of the nose of your dog, then say stand. Then move the treat above him so that he will have to stand in order to reach it. As soon as he stands say good boy! Then wait for him to sit back down to give him the treat. While he is standing you can move just a few steps while holding the treat. Praise him a lot if he follows you.

Teach your dog to Rollover:
Starting from the laying position, say roll over and then proceed to roll your dog over gently. Do this by grabbing his legs and then pull him, or simply push him from one side so that he makes a complete roll. After he has completed the roll, make him sit, praise him and give him the treat.

Teach your dog to Crawl:
Starting from the laying position, say crawl while holding a treat in front of your dog’s nose and move it a few inches away from him. If he begins to stand up, just say no crawl, start from the beginning and have him lay back down again. Praise him a lot and give him the treat as soon as he crawls, even if it’s only a few inches.

Teach your dog to Lay Down:
There are various ways to do this. Begin with having your dog sit then say, lay. Then present the treat in front of his mouth, going all the way down to the ground with your hand. The dog will naturally follow your hand and will end up lying down. Give him the treat only when he stretches his forearms in front of him and then praise.

Teach your dog to Focus:
Begin by sitting or kneeling, in front of your dog. Hide your hands so he won’t be distracted looking at them and then say your dog’s name followed by saying focus. As soon as he looks at you in the eyes start praising him. Always keep eye contact and after a few seconds give him a treat. If he looks elsewhere, just call him again and begin to start over. Try to extend the time while he’s focused on you.

Train Your Pup To Behave When Left Home Alone:

Coaching a puppy that spends a lot of time home alone could prove to be quite the challenge, but it’s not impossible. The best thing to do is to start training your pup right away. Serious habits and issues in growing dogs usually begin to develop around six months of age or older.

As the care giver of your new pup, it’s crucial for you to offer a place of comfort, safety and belonging. Puppies that are well nurtured will generally transform into a more mentally stable adult. Puppies that are denied the safety of affection and positive reinforcement will grow up fearful and filled with anxiety.

The very first point you need to establish in your new puppy, is that his new home is a place where he is accepted. As soon as your puppy feels he is secure and cherished, he’s ready to begin obedience training.

This form of training should execute as a matter of routine. Training sessions must be performed in a peaceful method, which should always end on a positive note. Your pet will look forward to each session especially if you reward his efforts with a treat. Be careful not to show any frustration and anger as this could reverse any previous training success.

There is a fine distinction between a dog requiring a firm hand because he behaves headstrong and willfully refuses to obey, and a canine requiring endurance because he lacks confidence or doesn’t quite understand. The fact of the matter is very simple. Generally, all dogs want to please their owner and be your best friend.

Training sessions should ultimately last no longer than 15 minutes. A puppy’s attention span is very similar like that of a small child’s. Curiosity will undoubtedly take over. Forcing a younger puppy to endure sessions longer than 15 minutes can be frustrating for the both of you. It may also be non-productive, and sabotage all training efforts.

A puppy that is left home alone for more than 4 hours a day requires proper coaching to be taught during that time without excessive barking or other destructive unruly behavior. Your puppy’s first learning experience begins the second that he enters your home. A useful tip is to have a TV or radio on low just before you leave the house as this may provide a setting where he does not feel completely alone.

How to Teach Your Puppy His Name:

Once you have chosen a name for your puppy, you need to teach him what it is. Your objective is to teach him that when his name is called, you are requesting his full attention and to look directly at you.

As you go on to teach your puppy commands, such as come, sit and stay, you’ll do this successfully if your puppy is focused on you whilst you are teaching him these commands – this is why it’s so important he knows his name and responds to it.

Your puppy will start to learn that the sound of his name will be followed by a command, so to him, his name means that something is being specifically asked of him. When you use your puppy’s name, you must keep it associated with good things. Don’t call his name and then proceed to yell at him because he’s chewed something of yours. If you do this too often he’ll start to associate his name with being screamed at and won’t respond when you call. Realistically, his is easier said than done, but it will be worth all your hard efforts in the end.

So arm yourself with some tasty treats and put a leash on your puppy. That way you have complete control if he gets distracted by something or tries to wander off. Call his name in a positive and voice. Puppy’s love to hear your voice and will naturally look towards you when they hear you speak. As he looks in your direction, give him a treat and praise him verbally with “good boy”. Repeat this several times each day until he consistently looks towards you every time his name is called.

The next progression is to introduce a distraction. Try this with other people in the room, out in the yard, in the driveway, when or anywhere else you can think of. Don’t rush this step and always make it easy for your puppy to succeed, he wants to please you, so do your best to make it easy for him.

You need to teach your puppy that wherever you are, no matter the distraction, if he hears his name he needs to look at you and wait for further instruction. So, take small steps that can easily be achieved, then you will both look forward to every training session.

Common Mistakes When Training Your New Pup

Puppies are capable of learning simple commands from a very young age. Don’t try to give your puppy a meaningful training session if he is highly excited, occupied with exploring, or tired. You need his complete attention. Otherwise you’re wasting both your time and his. You can build up to training sessions in more distracting environments once your puppy is reliably responding to your commands when at home.

When it comes to home training, you don’t need to be a rocket scientist to understand the concept, what goes in must come out. If you feed your puppy a quality, nutritious and balanced dog food and stick to regular meal times (3 times a day for young puppies, dropping down to twice a day for older dogs), then your puppy is more likely to have regular potty habits which means you’ll have a much better idea of what time to take him out. If, on the other hand, your constantly offering your puppy with treats and tidbits and feed him at random times of the day, you can expect your puppy to need to potty at any time of day too.

If you’re expectations are too high of your puppy to master all of your commands in the first couple of weeks, you are sadly mistaken and will be disappointed. Young puppies, in particular, have a lot of information to take in the first few weeks as they get settled into their new home away from their mom and siblings. Try to start off with two or three commands at the most sit. “Come” and “down” should be of top priority. Don’t move on to new commands until you are confident enough that your pup has mastered the basics.

Like an adolescent child, puppies have short attention spans and get tired very quickly. Remember, when training your puppy, keep sessions short. 5 to 10 minutes should be sufficient enough time. Two or three short training sessions every day is ideal. You can build in the command “come” throughout the day such as when you want to feed your puppy or take him outside.

A pup will learn much faster and affectively through the association of an action with a positive reward. However, our attention can also be very rewarding to a puppy. This can also include negative attention such as yelling, scolding, or punishment.

Why Does My Puppy Bite and How Do I Take Control?

Your puppies need for biting is a perfectly natural and essential phase to go through, especially when they are teething. With this being said, however, it is not acceptable to have your pup chewing on you, or anyone for that matter.

Puppy biting or nipping starts out as a bit of fun, but needs to be controlled quickly to avoid ongoing problems. Most puppies can be trained to regulate and minimize the biting fairly easily. The sooner you get started educating your puppy not to bite, the easier it will be. Remember, the younger the pup, the “softer” the bite.

Proven Techniques:

If you catch the biting, just try to redirect the biting from your flesh to a toy or chew bone. For very young puppies this method is often all you need do. As soon as your pup starts to bite your hands just let out a firm ”No!” and replace your fingers with a chew toy.

Make your puppy think he is hurting you each time he has a nip at you. This method replicates the way dogs sort out this biting amongst themselves. When puppies are biting and nipping each other it only stops when one puppy lets out a yelp. We can use this natural way dogs learn by letting out an “Ouch!”  every time your puppy bites. The trick is to startle your dog using your voice, and then pull away and stop playing with your puppy for a while. Your pup will soon learn that when he begins to bite, his friend goes away.

In bad biting cases, as soon as your puppy latches onto your hand say “No!” and quickly put your thumb inside his mouth under his tongue. Your other finger will be under his chin and pinch down, but not to tightly. This will feel uncomfortable to your puppy and he won’t be able to bite you.

If your puppy has an even more severe biting problem, try putting on a pair of gloves and apply a foul tasting substance to them. Your dog will soon understand that if he bites you, it won’t be very pleasant! This method produces a strong negative association to your dog every time he decides to bite you. Some dogs are smart enough to realize that when you take your foul tasting gloves off, it is fine to bite you again.

Private Education Lessons for Your Dog:

Are you afraid of a commitment to a six week class? Are your dog’s behavioral issues targeted to one specific area? Maybe you and your dog would just prefer a more intimate one-on-one training session? Look into private lessons for your canine friend. This is perfect if you always have a busy schedule. Realistic training goals personalized around your schedule.

Advanced Education Lessons:

An advanced education course will help to strengthen your dog’s maturity in everyday situations. After the completion of this intensive 6 week process, your dog will earn a Graduation Degree. Main issues covered such as, remaining calm while given affection, loose leash walking and how to heel, learning without giving in to distractions and specific games to build good reliability.

Intermediate Education Lessons:

An intermediate education course will help to develop your dog’s ability to further learn behaviors involving distance, duration and distractions. After making it through this extensive 6 week process, your dog will earn a certificate of completion. Key areas covered include, a brief review of basic commands such as to stay from a distance, heel, or stand. Learn how to focus despite any distractions, and games that will help to form your relationship.

Beginner Education Lessons:

Mostly intended for puppies but also welcomes adult dogs that have had no prior training. After this intensive 6 week process, your dog will earn a certificate of completion. Key topics covered such as simple cues, like sit, come, and to stay down. Learn problem solving and using respectable house manners. Take on health, grooming and proper dog nutrition as well as proper relationship building games.

Personal Dog Training Camp:

Make your dog’s day even more exciting by getting signed up today in a personal training camp. These sessions offer hands on training just for you and your canine friend. The pet training instructors arm themselves with positive reinforcing techniques to teach your dog some new skills, or to staying on top of a previous bad behavior.

Private Puppy Education:

Give your puppy the right start with classes that will encourage good behavior while helping you create that strong lasting bond with your pet. Specific areas including, introduction a simple command, such as sit, come here and stay there. Show basic manners and good social skills with other people and other dogs. Learn about relationship establishing games and problem prevention guidelines. Also, learn some tips about health, grooming and puppy nutritional facts.

Tips to Tricks For Your Pup (Part 2)

Sometimes a dog will have trouble learning a new trick. For example, not all dogs can learn to fetch. Some dogs have more instinct (they are born with it) than others when it comes to carrying things in their mouths.

Beg:

Have your dog sit, facing you. Hold his favorite treat just above his head and tell him, “Say please.” Your dog will probably lift his front feet off the ground to reach the treat. As soon as the feet are lifted, even a little bit, give him the dog treat.

Tip
This is a hard trick for most dogs. Wait a little longer each time before giving the treat, but be careful not to let your dog fall over on his back. You are helping your dog develop his balance. Be kind and only do this a couple of times.

Kiss:

Here’s an easy one: Every time your dog licks your face, say, “Give me a kiss. Good boy! Give me a kiss.” If he isn’t a licker, put a little peanut butter on your cheek and say, “Give me a kiss.” When he licks it off say, “Give me a kiss,” again.

Tip
Tricks like this work because you put words with something your dog does. Pretty soon your dog hears “Give me a kiss,” and thinks about licking your face. Then you give him a hug, rub his ears and say, “Good boy!” Dogs love that.

Roll Over:

Start by having your dog lie down on his belly. You can stand over him or kneel beside him. Using a treat, hold it by his nose, and then move it around and behind him, so that he lies on his side and then rolls over. Tell him what a great dog he is!

Tip
After your dog has figured out what he has to do to get a treat, start throwing the ball two times in a row without giving him the treat. What you are trying to do is give him the treats less and less often so someday he won’t need the treats in the ball to fetch it.

Say Hello:

Start by sitting on a chair. While holding a treat, put your hand between your knees and encourage your dog to get it. As soon as your dog’s chin touches your leg, say “Say Hello!”. Then say “Release” or “OK” and give him the treat after he lifts his head.

Tip
Only give your dog the treat after you have released him. Increase the time his chin is touching your leg, so eventually your dog will keep it there while you pet him. Then release him and reward him. Your dog will soon charm your friends with this trick!

Go Back:

This is an easy one! Stand facing your dog and as you walk toward him, say “Go Back”. He will want to get out of the way and will automatically walk backwards!

Tip
If your dog doesn’t walk back in a straight line, practice up against a wall or in a narrow hallway. After your dog is walking backward with you, try walking toward him only a step or two. Eventually, you will be able to stand still and say “Go Back”.

Take a Bow:

When you see your dog take a big stretch, with his head down low, say, “Take a bow.” Every time he wakes up and stretches, say, “Take a bow.” Someday you will say, “Take a bow.” and your dog will take a big stretch, but it will look like he is bowing. As soon as he is finished, give him the treat.

Tip
Dog tricks like this work because you put words with something your dog does. It may take some dogs longer than others to figure this one out. Some dogs learn it in a week and some take years…yes, years! But one day you will say, “Take a bow,” and maybe, just maybe, your dog will take a bow.

Lay Down:

With your dog in a stand position, take a treat and hold it near the floor, under his nose. As your dog reaches down to get it (he may try to lie down), slip your hand under his belly to hold his rear end up. Hold him in that position and say, “Take a bow.” Keep the treat right by his nose, but don’t feed him. Stay there for just a second, release him, and then feed the treat.

Tip:
If you feed your dog the treat while he is in the bowing position, in the future he won’t bow until he sees the treat in your hand. If he learns that the treat comes later, he’ll be willing to perform for you without it right there all the time.

Tips to Tricks For Your Pup (Part 1)

Tricks help your dog to learn. If your dog can learn tricks, then it can learn obedience and good manners. Go ahead…have some fun and teach your dog a new trick!

The best way to teach your dog a trick, is to make it fun. Use praise and small treats to reward your dog.
Practice new tricks only a few minutes at a time. You never want your dog to get bored when learning new things.

Shake Hands
Start by having your dog sit. Say, “Shake hands,” and take his paw with your hand. Hold his paw and say, “Good dog!” Let go of his paw. Do this a few times every day.
TIP:
After a while, say, “Shake hands,” but don’t take his paw. See if he raises his paw by himself. If not, keep showing him what to do by saying, “Shake hands,” and taking his paw with your hand. Your dog is not slow; he is just learning!

Turn Around or Turn Left
Start by having your dog stand up facing you. Let your dog see a treat in your hand. Stand still and say, “Turn around”. Lead the dog’s nose around to the left (clockwise) with the treat so he walks in a circle. When he comes back to where he’s facing you again, say, “Good dog!” and give him the treat.
TIP:
After some practice, hold the treat in front of you so your dog can see it and say, “Turn around,” but don’t lead his nose. See if he is ready to turn around by himself and get the treat. Pretty soon, he will turn around faster than you can say ‘Lassie!”
If you choose to use the words, “Turn Left”, use them all the time. Don’t use “Turn around” sometimes, and “Turn Left” other times. Be consistent.

Twirl or Turn Right
“Twirl” is the same trick as “Turn Around” (see above), but this time your dog turns to the right (counterclockwise), instead of to the left.
Start by having your dog stand up facing you. Stand still and say, “Twirl”. Lead the dog’s nose around to the right with the treat so he walks in a circle. When he comes back to where he’s facing you again, say, “Good dog!” and give him the treat.
If you choose to use the words, “Turn Right”, use them all the time. Don’t use “Twirl” sometimes, and “Turn Right” other times. Be consistent.

TIP:
After your dog has learned “Turn Around” (or Turn Left) and “Twirl” (or Turn Right), you can put them together and have your dog look really smart. First have your dog “Turn Around” (turn to the left), and then say “Twirl” (turn to the right). Be careful, though, don’t get your dog dizzy!
Be sure to teach Turn Around and Twirl separately. Wait until your dog has learned the first one very well.

Crawl
Start by having your dog lie down. Hold a treat just in front of his nose and say, “Crawl.” If he starts to stand up, say, “No, down…crawl.” Pull the treat away, keeping it low, near the ground and say, “Craaawl.” When your dog moves even an inch or two without standing up, praise him and say, “Good dog! Craaawl.”

TIP:
Your dog must know ‘Down’ ‘ before he can learn this trick.

Speak
Choose a game that your dog loves to play, like catch with a ball, or hide and seek with a toy. Then get him excited by saying, “Let’s play! Want to play?” and show him the ball or toy. Jump and act silly so he barks and then say, “Good dog, speak!” Then play the game as his reward for learning “Speak”.

TIP:
You can’t make a dog bark, but you can get him happy and excited so he wants to bark. After a while, your dog will bark when you say, “Speak.”
Caution! If you have a dog that already causes trouble because of his barking, you might not want to encourage this behavior. If you decide it’s ok to teach it, be sure to teach “Quiet”, too.

Take a Nap
Have your dog lie down on his tummy. As you gently roll him over on his side, say, “Take a nap.” While he is lying on his side, keeping his head on the floor, say, “Take a nap.” Don’t give him a treat. Encourage him to stay there for a couple of seconds. Then say, “Ok” or “Wake up!”, let him stand up, and give him his reward.

TIP:
You can use the treat to lure your dog into a lying down position. Don’t give your a dog a reward while he is lying down. Give him a treat after he has completed the trick.